OUR EARS ARE BIG. WANNA TALK TO US?

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Have you read Grace on the Moon‘s ground-breaking 21 Questions interview series?  If not, click the link and see what people are saying.

21 Questions is a series of interviews with people who currently have an eating disorder or have recovered from one.  The same 21 questions are asked of each person.  Each interview sketches a picture of someone who has been in the depths of the reality of an eating disorder, and is either still working on blazing a path out of it or has gone on to recover.

This series includes perspectives from people from many different walks of life: single, married, with or without kids, different age groups, multiple nationalities, recovered and still sick.  The goal is to help those who have or had an eating disorder, as well as those who love them or professionally treat them, better understand the mindset of someone sick with anorexia, bulimia, binge eating disorder or EDNOS (eating disorder not otherwise specified).  Sufferers can feel less alone and be inspired by stories from the recovered, loved ones can gain insight into what the people they care about are thinking and feeling, and professionals can get a detailed understanding of what their clients go through.

The interviews take place via email, and you can be completely anonymous.  A first name only is used, and it can be your real name or a pseudonym that is chosen either by you or Grace on the MoonWe are particularly hoping to showcase some new interviews with people who are male, LGBT, a minority, older, or from a non-Christian religious background, as those viewpoints are often less heard than others, but we are open to people from all walks of life.  All interviewees are welcome!  If you are interested in being interviewed, please contact us.

Visit Grace on the Moon, a website for eating
disorders information and recovery:
http://www.graceonthemoon.com

Photo at top of blog is copyrighted to Moon,
Administrator of Grace on the Moon

21 QUESTIONS: INTERVIEW WITH DARCY

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21 Questions is a series of interviews with people who currently have an eating disorder or have recovered from one.  The same 21 questions are asked of each person.  Each interview sketches a picture of someone who has been in the depths of the reality of an eating disorder and is either still working on blazing a path out of it or has gone on to recover. Some of the names used have been changed at the request of the interviewee.   If you would like to be interviewed for this series, please contact us.

Interview with Darcy:

Q: How old are you?
A: 31

Q: Male or female?
A: Female

Q. How long have/did you have an eating disorder?
A: 21 years
 
Q: Which one do/did you have, or has it been more than one (anorexia, bulimia, binge eating disorder, EDNOS, compulsive exercising)?
A: I started with anorexia for 2 years then graduated to bulimia. For many years I vacillated between the two; I starved all day and binged/purged all night. I have also been a compulsive exerciser for most of my life and am currently EDNOS (I still purge). I abused laxatives, diet pills and diuretics for years. 
 
Q: Who in your life knows about it?
A: Only a couple of close friends know the whole truth. My family, other friends and colleagues know some things from what they have observed or the few times I have alluded to an eating disorder.

Q: What person in your life was the most helpful and supportive during both sickness and recovery?
A: The couple of close friends that know the whole truth have been there for me whenever I needed them. It is hard for people to support you when they do not know you are suffering. 

Q: What person that you might have wanted or expected more from was the least helpful and supportive?
A: My mum. When I was younger, she was just so angry about my eating disorder. I felt like I couldn’t talk to her about it. As I got older and lived away from home, I hid so much from her because I know that that anger stemmed from hurt and despair. She didn’t know how to help me, and no one gave her the tools back then. I still wish I could sit down and tell her everything, but I know it would upset her. We are so close that it seems wrong to have such a big “secret” from her. 

Q: Do you or have you ever sought professional help, such as a therapist, psychiatrist, nutritionist, doctor, support group or inpatient treatment?  Specify which kind of help you had.
A: I was forced to go to a doctor when I was younger by my parents. As an adult I have sought professional help from my doctor who referred me to a nutritionist. I found the nutritionist didn’t help much and I could never follow a meal plan. I was also referred to a therapist. I found the therapist very helpful. She didn’t help my eating disorder to improve, but talking to someone was therapeutic and gave me a clearer understanding of myself. I have been to Overeaters Anonymous, and also did Freedom Sessions (a Christian 12-step program), which I did not complete because I found the food at the meetings too triggering. I am currently awaiting a referral to an out-patient program. 

Q: What was most helpful to you about that help?
A: I think the things that were hardest and that hurt – like digging up painful memories from my past – were most helpful. It was freeing to identify the things that contributed to my eating disorder from childhood, and to confront the pain that I have been numbing with an eating disorder for so long. I found doing inventories in the 12-step program was upsetting but necessary in identifying the hurt that I have buried for so long.

Q: What issue(s) do you feel affected or influenced developing an eating disorder?
A: My home environment when I was young: I needed control and being a perfectionist was encouraged. I always had a sense that nothing was ever good enough. I used my eating disorder to numb the anxiety I felt living with a controlling father and dealing with my parents’ unhappy marriage. 
Ballet: my chosen profession is a breeding ground for eating disorders, especially the aesthetic look that is hard to attain. My ballet teacher told me from the time I was ten that I needed to eat less and be thinner. 
My genetics: I am not naturally thin, which was hard when I was so obsessed with being a ballerina. Even now as a ballet teacher, I long to look a certain way that I can only achieve through extreme starvation. I have always had a naturally curvy body and thick legs. I hate it.

Q: Besides yourself, who in your life do you think is/was most affected by how your eating disorder hurt you?
A: Definitely my family, especially when I was younger and lived at home. Now I hide so much of it from them. Back then I know that it caused a lot of worry and hurt and I regret that. They had no idea what to do for me, and any efforts they made to help me were rebuffed because I didn’t want help. I was so selfish and didn’t think about how it was affecting them. It was all consuming. There was no room for worrying about other people and how it might hurt the people that loved me. 
 
Q: What was the first major breakthrough you had in recovery?
A: The realization that recovery was actually possible. For years I had told myself that recovery was not attainable for me. I believed that I would always live with an eating disorder, just to a lesser extent. I had never believed it was possible to be 100% free of it. I think it was a form of denial so that I could justify continuing to be sick.  I still believe it is possible to be healed even though I do not consider myself recovered right now. 

Q: What is/was the hardest truth to accept about what you have to do in order to recover?
A: I have to give up my eating disorder. It is a choice I have to make. 

Q: If you could be eating disorder free for a day, what things would you do?/If you are recovered, what things do you do now that were very difficult when you were still sick?
A: I would not count calories. I would eat whatever I felt like and exercise if I wanted to rather than because I had too. I would enjoy more quality time with family and friends around meals without anxiety over what I was eating. I would use the time I spend binging, purging, starving, exercising, food prepping, calorie tracking, shopping for food and thinking about food to be more creative. I am often too tired to do things like be social or write more because I am suffering the side effects of my eating disorder. I have no energy to do the things I would like to do. I would read more books instead of reading eating disorder memoirs or watching eating disorder movies or reading eating disorder blogs. The list of things to do in a life free of an eating disorder seems endless to me. I would enjoy the taste of pasta with my family instead of eating rice cakes all alone. I would enjoy the pleasure of a piece of cake with a friend instead of the taste of guilt and the desperation to go purge rather than sit and enjoy myself. 
 
Q: What one piece of advice would you give to someone new to admitting they have an eating disorder?
A: It is a long, painful road ahead but you are worth it. You will relapse, I am almost certain of that. You will want to give up trying. It will almost definitely get worse before you get better. Do not quit. You deserve recovery. You deserve freedom. Life is too short to let your eating disorder steal one more day from you. Give it up. Let it go. Live. 

Q: What one suggestion would you give to a loved one trying to support someone with an eating disorder?
A: You will never understand what someone with an eating disorder is feeling or what the voice in their head sounds like. You need to educate yourself in order to help them. Logic and reason will never prevail. Don’t get frustrated. Don’t tell them to “just eat something”. They need love because they cannot love themselves. Sometimes the best thing you can say is nothing at all. 
 
Q:  Do/did you seek support online?  If so, what kind of support and did it help you?
A: Yes. Mostly I have found support in a community of bloggers who suffer the same. There is solidarity in reaching out to others, even though we cannot help ourselves. 

Q: If you are sure you will not go back to your eating disorder, what gives you that confidence?/If you are scared you will relapse, what is your biggest trigger?
A: Stress is a trigger, whether it is in a relationship or at work. I have a lot of anxiety and use my eating disorder to feel control when it seems that my life is not under control. Weight is my biggest trigger. Eventually I return to the eating disorder because I cannot stand myself.
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Q:  If you have children or plan to in the future, are you concerned about how your eating disorder may affect them?  If you recovered before you had kids, do you think your experience with the eating disorder will help you to better guide your child away from developing one?
A: My biggest fear is having a daughter who gets an eating disorder because of me. I would hope that I would be able to prevent it because of my own experience. I would hope that I was well enough to be a mother that could raise a daughter who loved herself and her body and had a healthy relationship with food. I fear being pregnant because I cannot deal with weight gain, and I am certain that after having a baby I would relapse because of it. 

Q:  Did you read books or workbooks to help with your recovery?  If so, are there any specific ones you recommend?
A: I have read every memoir that I can get my hands on. I found books like “Sensing The Self”, “Why Women Want,” and “Lying The Weight” to be helpful. I have tried a couple of workbooks, too, and they are good for creating awareness of moods, feelings, etc., and being able to map out patterns that trigger eating disorder behaviours. I enjoy workbooks because of the level of awareness that they create. I find it helpful to write things out. 
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Q:  What song, album or musical artist comes to mind when you think of good music to listen to while trying to make positive changes in your life?
A: As a Christian, God is my only hope for recovering from this. I listen to a lot of Christian music. It is inspirational and uplifting. I enjoy artists like Selah, Downhere, Hillsong and myriad other contemporary Christian artists. One of my favourite things to listen to is old hymns. “It Is Well With My Soul” is my anthem.
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Visit Grace on the Moon, a website for eating
disorders information and recovery:
http://www.graceonthemoon.com

Photo at top of blog is from the Flickr account of Okiave

21 QUESTIONS: INTERVIEW WITH JANICE

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21 Questions is a series of interviews with people who currently have an eating disorder or have recovered from one.  The same 21 questions are asked of each person.  Each interview sketches a picture of someone who has been in the depths of the reality of an eating disorder, and is either still working on blazing a path out of it or has gone on to recover. Some of the names used have been changed at the request of the interviewee.   If you would like to be interviewed for this series, please contact us.

Q:  How old are you?
A.  34
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Q: Male or female?
A.  Female
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Q:  How long have you had/did you have an eating disorder?
A.  I’ve had issues with food for as long as I can remember.
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Q:  Which one do/did you have, or has it been more than one (anorexia, bulimia, binge eating disorder, EDNOS, compulsive exercising)?
A.  Compulsive overeating, then bulimia, then exercise bulimia.  Somewhere in EDNOS category now.
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Q:  Who in your life knows about your eating disorder?
A.  Family, therapist, 2 close friends, masseuse.
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Q:  What person in your life was the most helpful and supportive during both sickness and recovery?
A.  I’m still recovering, but I’d have to say my therapist. She was originally my familly therapist, but then my therapist quit on me, and I was lost for a couple years.  When I found the strength to reach out again, I initially contacted her for references, but she offered to be my therapist and hasn’t looked back since. She puts up with my issues and fears of being abandoned and is helping me.
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Q:  What person that you might have wanted or expected more from was the least helpful and supportive?
A.  My old therapist. I didn’t expect her to quit on me after 7 years.  Also, my parents were really supportive surrounding the time I was really sick and got put inpatient, but it’s like they’ve forgotten I have issues with food or need support or role models for healthy eating. But it’s hard if they obviously have some of their own issues with food, too.
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Q:  Do you or have you ever sought professional help, such as a therapist, psychiatrist, nutritionist, doctor, support group or inpatient treatment?  Specify which kind of help you had.
A. Therapist, doctor(s), social worker, nutritionist, trainer, energy healer (two), family therapist.  Inpatient, which was a crappy, world-renowned program, which was only geared toward anorexics, and I think made me fester longer in developing unhealthier thoughts.
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Q:  What was most helpful to you about the help you got?
A.  Having the support at the day treatment place with all that staff after my inpatient stay.
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Q:  What issue(s) do you feel affected or influenced developing an eating disorder?
A.  Severe, chronic depression.  Feelings of unworthiness and not being good enough.
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Q:  Besides yourself, who in your life do you think is/was most affected by how your eating disorder hurt you?
A:  My parents?  I honestly don’t know or think that my eating disorder affected anyone.  I think the self-injury issues I struggled with scared the bejesus out of my parents.
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Q:  What was the first major breakthrough you had in recovery?
A:  Hard to pinpoint.  Probably when I started to see that the behaviors I was choosing to engage in weren’t satisfying to me any more, or I could rationally see that ‘doing XYZ is not going to fix what hurts’.
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Q:  What is/was the hardest truth to accept about what you have to do in order to recover?
A:  That I have to change the way I think, to see myself as worthy.
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Q:  If you could be eating disorder-free for a day, what things would you do?/If you are recovered, what things do you do now that were very difficult when you were still sick?
A:  Not sure.
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Q:  What one piece of advice would you give to someone new to admitting they have an eating disorder?
A:  Don’t hide with it.  Be open.  Confide in people you trust.  Realize you deserve better.
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Q:  What one suggestion would you give to a loved one trying to support someone with an eating disorder?
A:  Just be there; don’t judge them.  Be open to what they need.  Don’t be critical.
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Q:  Do/did you seek support online?  If so, what kind of support and did it help you?
A:  I used to be active at an eating disorder site during college.  It helped so much to connect with people going through the same thing, and I met some great friends I still keep in touch with.
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Q:  If you are sure you will not go back to your eating disorder, what gives you that confidence?/If you are scared you will relapse, what is your biggest trigger?
A:  My triggers are all around.  I think I’m blindly thinking I’m further in recovery than I actually am, but I think I’ve just swapped back to my eating disorder roots, and it’s a trigger to see myself gain weight.
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Q:  If you have children or plan to in the future, are you concerned about how your eating disorder may affect them?  If you recovered before you had kids, do you think your experience with the eating disorder will help you to better guide your child away from developing one?
A:  I don’t think anyone is ever going to find me attractive enough to date, so I’ll be alone for life.  But if I ever do find someone, I’m terrified to have kids.  I’m certain they’d be fucked up, and I’d be too scared to pass along things or scar them for life by doing/saying the wrong thing.
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Q:  Did you read books or workbooks to help with your recovery?  If so, are there any specific ones you recommend?
A:  Not really.  I don’t think reading eating disorder books helps recovery.
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Q:  What song, album or musical artist comes to mind when you think of good music to listen to while trying to make positive changes in your life?
A:  I like a lot of alternative music, like 30 Seconds to Mars, One Republic, Guster.  And then there’s show tunes.  Nothing is more empowering than blasting “Rent” or “Rock of Ages” and singing at the top of your lungs.

Visit Grace on the Moon, a website for eating
disorders information and recovery:
http://www.graceonthemoon.com

FORK YOU: PUBLIC FOOD SHAMING & HOW TO FIGHT BACK

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There are a lot of “shame” related phrases and hashtags floating around these days, including “fat shaming”, “body shaming”, and “slut shaming”.  One of the newest terms gaining momentum affects a lot of people, primarily women, and often takes place in public.

Food Shaming.

Food shaming is the act of making direct comments to or about a person that show the speaker’s disapproval of what that person is eating.  The food is often high in calorie or fat content (or perceived to be), and the message is that only thinner people have the “right” to eat it.  Sometimes it’s a friend accompanying you on a trip to the grocery store who criticizes an item you put in your cart, informing you that there are fat-free options available.  It might be your spouse sitting across from you at the breakfast table, telling you the food you’re about to enjoy is “bad”.

More and more these days, it’s a perfect stranger who believes she or he has been designated a valued member of the Food Shaming Police.  Women, in particular, are reporting in growing numbers that a passing individual or group of people feel it’s their place to verbally chastise the food choice the woman has made.  How sad is it that a person cannot enjoy an ice cream cone while standing on a street corner, lift a forkful of a luscious pasta dish in a restaurant, or take a free sample from a grocery store display without risking a member of the Food Shaming Police issuing them a verbal citation.

Public food shaming might come in the form of an obvious slur from some frat boy type who yells out to a woman that she is “fat enough”, and has no business enjoying dessert at a sidewalk cafe.  It might be an older person emitting a “tsk-tsk” when the person in front of her in line at a coffee house orders a drink with whole fat milk.  It might be a group of friends who make mooing noises, perhaps leaving their victim not even knowing which cretin belched out the insult.

Food Shaming in Social Media

Food shaming often takes place in social media, when some jerk thinks he’s dispensing bon mots by leaving derogatory comments for a picture of a person eating something besides a piece of lettuce.  People often feel comfortable snapping a quick picture of a stranger with their phone and posting it to Facebook or Instagram, all with the intention of ridiculing the subject of the photo and what she or he is eating.  Too often, people believe it’s their birth right to food shame others, and the trend seems to be growing.

Instagram now has a page called You Did Not Eat That, which features pictures of mostly models and celebrities posing with non-diet food.  The idea is that these people are presumed to have tossed that gooey slice of pizza or over-sized cookie into the trash once the photo shoot is over, and are merely pretending they eat like everyone else.  While eating disorders are prevalent in the entertainment industry, it’s rather presumptuous to assume no one in the photos could really eat the food they are posing with (even Oscar-winning actor Jared Leto and former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher don’t escape condemning comments left by followers).

One particular place that people – again, especially women – experience food shaming is on public transportation.  It’s become so prevalent that there is even a group addressing it on Facebook called Women Who Eat on Tubes (the “tube” is the London subway system).  Their goal is to “celebrate and encourage women eating food on tubes”, and not to marginalize them.  I can’t speak to how the women who are photographed might feel, since clearly many of the pictures seem to be taken without them knowing, but I appreciate that the group is trying to normalize what doesn’t need justification in the first place.

The Fork Whose Ass You’ll Want To Kick

Have you heard of the Food Shaming Fork (its creators prefer you call it by its official name – the HAPIfork)?  This new invention is a fork with attitude.  It measures how long you spend eating a meal, the amount of times you put the fork in your mouth, and how long between each mouthful.  The information is then digitally tracked via USB or Bluetooth to monitor if you are eating in a way that will help you lose weight.  The fork lights up and vibrates when it wants to let you, and anyone near you who must be wondering why your fork has taken on a life of its own, know you are being bad and need to correct the way you are eating (I cannot make this stuff up).  Jessica Roy wrote a funny article detailing her week of using the HAPIfork you can read here.

Fighting Back

Hollaback! is a non-profit organization, with groups in 79 cities and 26 countries, that offers ideas and support in helping people deal with street harassment.  The group defines such harassment as pertaining to things like sexist, racist, homophobic and transphobic comments and actions, but also includes those who are “sizeist”, which is discrimination against people based on the size of their bodies.  The Boston branch of Hollaback! was showcased in a CBS news feature about food shaming, and encourages anyone who is a victim to stand up for themselves through a variety of channels.

In a Huffington Post article about public food shaming, nutritional coach Isabel Foxen Duke attributes the reason behind this phenomenon as being related to women’s perceived traditional societal and gender obligations: “Women are supposed to be trying to lose weight or maintain their figures at all times. So if you’re [eating in public], you’re basically saying, ‘Hey, I have a right not to diet,’ and you’re going to get backlash. At the end of the day, not trying to lose weight is counter-cultural for women.”

Sometimes fighting yet another attempt to shame us as individuals is tiring, but it’s beneficial to take a stand both outwardly to others and within your own head. Talk to your friends about why it’s important to combat food shaming.  Take a stand on social media, when you see someone in public being victimized, and if you find yourself under attack. Don’t offer excuses for what you’re eating and end up food shaming yourself. Food is not deserving of shame, and neither is anyone who consumes it.

 Visit Grace on the Moon, a website for eating
disorders information and recovery:
http://www.graceonthemoon.com

Photo at top of blog is from the Flickr account
of Sylvar.

 

DO YOU BELONG TO A PRO-EATING DISORDER WEBSITE? SPEAK YOUR MIND.

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Grace on the Moon is looking for people who participate (or did in the past) in pro-eating disorder (pro-ana/mia) websites.  We are conducting interviews with current or former owners, moderators and members of pro-eating disorder sites, particularly those with forums.

The point of the article is not to judge anyone, or focus on any perceived dangers of such sites, but rather to better understand what attracts a person to these sites, how they participate, and what benefits they feel they get from them.   We are hoping to speak to a mix of people, including those who defend their participation in such sites, as well as those who have mixed feelings or regrets.

All interviews will take place via email, and first names only will be used (or an alias if preferrred).  If you would like to express your opinions and thoughts about what you get or used to get out of being involved with a pro-eating disorder website, please contact us.

Visit Grace on the Moon, a website for eating
disorders information and recovery:
http://www.graceonthemoon.com

Photo at top of blog is from the Flickr account
of williamhartz

21 QUESTIONS: INTERVIEW WITH MANDY

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21 Questions is a series of interviews with people who currently have an eating disorder or have recovered from one.  The same 21 questions are asked of each person.  Each interview sketches a picture of someone who has been in the depths of the reality of an eating disorder, and is either still working on blazing a path out of it or has gone on to recover. Some of the names used have been changed at the request of the interviewee.   If you would like to be interviewed for this series, please contact us.

Interview with Mandy:

Q: How old are you?
A. 25
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Q: Male or female?
A. Female.
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Q. How long have/did you have an eating disorder?
A. 3 years.
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Q: Which one do/did you have, or has it been more than one (anorexia, bulimia, binge eating disorder, EDNOS, compulsive exercising)?
A. EDNOS and then Emotional/Compulsive Overeating.
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Q: Who in your life knows about it?
A. My friends and family. I don’t keep it a secret.
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Q: What person in your life was the most helpful and supportive during both sickness and recovery?
A. God.
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Q: What person that you might have wanted or expected more from was the least helpful and supportive?
A. My mom.
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Q: Do you or have you ever sought professional help, such as a therapist, psychiatrist, nutritionist, doctor, support group or inpatient treatment?  Specify which kind of help you had.
A. Yes. I’ve had counseling, gone to a nutritionist, support group, psychiatrist, inpatient.
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Q: What was most helpful to you about that help?
A. My support group and counseling helped me the most.
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Q: What issue(s) do you feel affected or influenced developing an eating disorder?
A. Growing up being called fat and ugly led to EDNOS; after escaping an abusive relationship and going through severe depression, emotional overeating developed.
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Q: Besides yourself, who in your life do you think is/was most affected by how your eating disorder hurt you?
A. My fiance, or anyone in a relationship with me who cares about me.
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Q: What was the first major breakthrough you had in recovery?
A. That God loves me as I am, and I should accept myself and care for myself as his precious daughter.
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Q: What is/was the hardest truth to accept about what you have to do in order to recover?
A. I needed to be a parent to myself and practice self-control.
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Q: If you could be eating disorder free for a day, what things would you do?/If you are recovered, what things do you do now that were very difficult when you were still sick?
A. I wouldn’t worry about calories!! I wouldn’t even think about food as being an issue. I’d live without that worry.
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Q: What one piece of advice would you give to someone new to admitting they have an eating disorder?
A. It’s not easy, but it’s possible.  There is hope, and you need to hang on to that hope, especially when it is hardest to keep on.
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Q: What one suggestion would you give to a loved one trying to support someone with an eating disorder?
A. Don’t pressure them or come down on them for their issue, instead put an emphasis on making positive remarks about healthy habits.
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Q: Do/did you seek support online?  If so, what kind of support and did it help you?
A. I don’t.
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Q: If you are sure you will not go back to your eating disorder, what gives you that confidence?/If you are scared you will relapse, what is your biggest trigger?
A. I still go back, and it’s my emotional problems.  When I feel depressed or “empty”.
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Q: If you have children or plan to in the future, are you concerned about how your eating disorder may affect them?  If you recovered before you had kids, do you think your experience with the eating disorder will help you to better guide your child away from developing one?
A. I am hoping I will be in a healthier place then.  Kids pick up on things, and I know it will affect them.  I’m hoping I can teach my children self-love, and to take care of themselves.
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Q: Did you read books or workbooks to help with your recovery?  If so, are there any specific ones you recommend?
A. “Real Gorgeous” by Kaz Kooke.

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Q:  What song, album or musical artist comes to mind when you think of good music to listen to while trying to make positive changes in your life?
A. Icon For Hire “Get Well”.

Visit Grace on the Moon, a website for eating
disorders information and recovery:
http://www.graceonthemoon.com

Photo at top of blog is from the Flickr account
of Paco CT

 

TOP 10 BROADWAY MUSICAL LYRICS TO KICK-START YOUR RECOVERY

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I’m an unabashed theatre nerd.  I’ve seen a lot of plays, including comedy and drama, and a growing number of musicals, ranging from those done in hole-in-the-wall spaces to touring Broadway productions.
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I compiled a Top 10 List of songs from musical theatre that provide a well-turned lyric that can be applied to recovery from an eating disorder.  I decided not to go with the Captain Obvious choice for each play, although some are too perfect to pick any other tune (like a certain show-stopper from a green witch).  Which ones ring true to you?  Which song lyrics would you add to reflect your own recovery mantras and choices?  Here they are, numbered only for sequencing, rather than which ones I like best:
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 10. Rocky Horror Picture Show “Over at the Frankenstein Place” 
“The darkness must go
Down the river of night’s dreaming
Flow morphia slow
Let the sun and light come streaming
Into my life, into my life”
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Indeed, we must let go of our pain and our pasts in order to make room for the light and the future.
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9. Wicked “Defying Gravity”
“And if I’m flying solo
At least I’m flying free
To those who’d ground me
Take a message back from me
Tell them how I am defying gravity”
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It can be painful to leave behind people, places, and situations that kept us feeling earthbound for so long, but we all have wings, even if we’re scared to test them.
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8. Jesus Christ Superstar “Strange Thing Mystifying”
“Who are you to criticize her?
Who are you to despise her?
Leave her, leave her, let her be now
Leave her, leave her, she’s with me now”
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Our new recovery voice can speak for us, whether in simple acts like repeating affirmations or making long overdue declarations to those who would judge us.
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7. Rent “No Day But Today”
“Forget regret or life is yours to miss
No other road
No other way
No day but today”
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We really do have a limited amount of time to get things right.  Every day that we think “tomorrow I will begin”, we surrender another day to regret.
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6. Hedwig & the Angry Inch “Midnight Radio”

“And you’re shining like the brightest star
A transmission on the midnight radio
And you’re spinnin’ like a forty-five
Ballerina dancing to your rock and roll”
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Be sure to incorporate music, dancing, art, writing or other creative elements into your recovery.  Don’t worry if you aren’t “normal”.  Be a rock-n-roll ballerina, if that’s what blows your tutu up!
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5. Chicago “Mister Cellophane”
“Cellophane, Mister Cellophane
Should have been my name
Mister Cellophane
‘Cause you can look right through me
Walk right by me,
And never know I’m there”
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This attitude can be relegated to the garbage can, and a new way of letting others see us can set us free.  Don’t assume you’ll always be invisible or that you deserve it.  Stake a claim for just who you are and who you want to be, and act in ways that allow the right people to see just how fabulous you are.
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4. Tommy “Pinball Wizard”
“He ain’t got no distractions
Can’t hear no buzzers and bells
Don’t see no lights a flashin
Plays by sense of smell”
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Not all moves we make in recovery have clear directions.  Sometimes the biggest steps we take are done in what feels like the dark and the silence.  Develop your intuition, and learn to trust the healthy voice that is reemerging.  You can master the game this way.
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3. Cats “Memory”
“Daylight, I must wait for the sunrise
I must think of a new life
And I mustn’t give in
When the dawn comes
Tonight will be a memory, too
And a new day will begin
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The bedraggled old Grizabella is right.  No matter how dark the night, dawn always comes, and you can ascend to the next level of recovery.  Do not give up just because it’s dark right now.
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2. Spamalot “I’m All Alone”
“Each one of us is all alone
So what are we to do
In order to get through?
We must be lonely side by side”
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Not only does no one recover alone, but we all benefit from having positive friendships and romantic relationships that lift us up throughout our lives.  Even when we are walking through a dark time that only we can truly experience, the journey is always easier when we know others who have gone through their own struggles are walking beside us, offering encouragement and love.
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1. Scrubs – “My Musical” episode “What’s Going to Happen?”
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“What’s going to happen?
What does the future hold?
So many things that I put off
Assuming I’d have time
Assuming I’d grow old”

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While this is an episode of the tv medical comedy “Scrubs”, and not an actual musical, it counts (the episode was almost entirely Broadway type songs). A woman facing her mortality came to a stark realization, just as so many in recovery who face a health crisis do, too.
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While we cannot control everything, we definitely can map out a plan to do our best not only to live a long healthy life full of bucket list items crossed off, but we can truly want this for ourselves.  Not just existing, but living with joy and appreciation – embracing the comedy, the drama, and the music that life has to offer.

Visit Grace on the Moon, a website for eating
disorders information and recovery:
http://www.graceonthemoon.com

Photo at top of blog is from the Flickr account
of Garry Knight